TEMPORARY LOCATION! Sundays at 10:30 a.m. and Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m.     (directions)

John states (John 1:1) that Christ who was one with God and was God from all eternity, became flesh and tabernacled among us (John 1:14). Paul likewise states that Christ, who was in the form of God, took upon Him the likeness of men (Phil. 2:6, 7); and “God was manifest in the flesh” (1 Tim. 3:16); and He who was the effulgence of God’s glory and the express image of His person (Heb. 1:3), took upon Himself the seed of Abraham and was in all things made like unto His brethren (Heb. 2:16, 17). Luke, in greater detail, presents the historical fact of His incarnation, both as to the conception and birth (Luke 1:26-38).

When considering the result of the incarnation, two important truths should be recognized: (1) Christ became at the same time and in the absolute sense very God and very man, and (2) in becoming flesh, He, though laying aside His glory, in no sense laid aside His Deity.

The Bible presents many contrasts, but none more striking than that one Person should be at the same time very God and very man. Illustrations from the Scriptures of these contrasts are many: He was weary, yet He called the weary to Himself for rest. He was hungry, yet He was “the bread of life.” He was thirsty, yet He was “the water of life.” He was in an agony, yet He healed all manner of disease and soothed every pain. He “grew, and waxed strong in spirit,” yet He was from all eternity. He was tempted, yet He, as God, could not be tempted. He became self-limited in knowledge, yet He was the wisdom of God. He said (with reference to His humiliation, being made for a little time lower than the angels), “My Father is greater than I,” yet He also said, “He that hath seen me hath seen the Father,” and, “I and my Father are one.” He prayed, yet He answered prayer. He wept at the tomb, yet He called the dead to arise. He asked, “Whom do men say that I the Son of man am?” yet He “needed not that any should testify of man: for he knew what was in man” He said, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” yet it was the very God to whom He cried who was at that moment “in Christ reconciling the world unto himself.” He died, yet He is eternal life. He was God’s ideal man, and man’s ideal God.

From this it may be seen that the Lord Jesus Christ sometimes functioned His earth-life within the sphere of that which was perfectly human and sometimes within the sphere of that which was perfectly divine. His divine Being was never limited in any degree by the fact of His humanity, nor did He minister to His human need from His divine resources. He could turn stones into bread to feed His human hunger, but this He never did.

The student should observe (1) the fact of Christ’s humanity, and (2) the Biblical reasons for His incarnation. *

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